Trump's Lawyer Denies Reports Mueller Subpoenaed Deutsche Bank Financial Records

Katrina Barker
December 6, 2017

A lawyer for President Donald Trump says it's not true that special counsel Robert Mueller has subpoenaed financial records relating to the president.

Germany's largest bank received a subpoena from Mueller several weeks ago to provide information on certain money and credit transactions, the person said, without giving details, adding key documents had been handed over in the meantime.

Mr Mueller issued a subpoena to the bank several weeks ago demanding data on transactions linked to the U.S. president, Reuters news agency and a German newspaper say.

In June, the German bank rejected requests for account records by Democrats in the US House of Representatives to provide details of the president's finances.

Manafort is facing felony charges involving allegations of money laundering and other financial crimes related to work in Ukraine. He had reached a tentative agreement with the government. Russian Federation has denied meddling in the election and Trump has called the special counsel's investigation a "witch hunt".

According to media reports, Mr. Trump owed Deutsche Bank as much as $340 million (€286.5 million) at one point, though considerable restructuring appears to have brought down that amount.

Mueller incorporated several ongoing investigations within the Justice Department including those of Trump campaign contacts with Russian Federation, former Trump campaign chairman Paul Manafort's business activities and former national security adviser Michael Flynn.

The expenses are from the date of Mueller's appointment, May 17, through September 30, the end of the federal government's fiscal year.

The bulk of the spending - $1.7 million - has been on personnel salary and benefits, according to the report. The rest was spent on the relocation of Justice Department employees temporarily assigned to the expanding investigation, the report shows.

For example, Patrick Fitzgerald was a special counsel who investigated a far narrower subject: a leak that exposed the identity of covert Central Intelligence Agency officer Valerie Plame.

The Mueller probe also spent $157,339 for a variety of contractual services - $111,245 for information technology, $24,456 for transcription and $17,217 for building services.

Other reports by AllAboutTopnews

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