Facebook wants your nudes to fight revenge porn

Lena Tucker
November 9, 2017

They will then be asked to send the pictures they are concerned about to themselves on Messenger while the e-safety commissioner's office notifies Facebook of their submission.

The new pilots - which are taking place in three countries besides Australia - are just part of a series of measures Facebook has been rolling out to combat the growing social problem of intimate images shared without the subject's permission.

Facebook can now digitally "hash" the media; this means that the company converts the image into a unique digital fingerprint that can be used to identify and block any attempts to re-upload that same image.

Once the nude image is uploaded, Facebook will use technology to "hash it", which is essentially giving it a digital fingerprint.

In Australia, Facebook's customer support team has been reviewing blurred versions of the image in order to determine whether or not it is explicit. Before you tantalize him with those curves, send the image to yourself via Messenger and flag it "non-consensual intimate image".

Julie Inman Grant, Austrailian eSafety Commissioner, says the program has the potential to disable the "control and power perpetrators hold over victims", particularly in cases of ex-partner retribution and sextortion. The sender is then also recommended to delete the image.

Furthermore, the system will only protect you from revenge porn on Facebook.

In a statement shared with Newsweek, one law firm said the initiative could make a big impact on addressing the issue, so long as Facebook is able to properly secure the naked images and videos that are sent to it.

Here in Ireland, Tánaiste Frances Fitzgerald publicised the Government's intentions to criminalise revenge porn in May of this year.

It is believed that a full four percent of USA internet users are victims of revenge porn.

It is important to note that 4% of US internet users have become victims of revenge porn, according to a 2016 study. Once the photo has been uploaded, Facebook's hashing system can recognize the photo without it being visible to the public.

Facebook has come up with an unusual method of tackling the menace of revenge porn, one that might even seem insane as well. The social media company will then put the image through its processing, create a signature - hash - and then using it in future will prevent uploading of any similar images on the social network for that one particular user.

Other reports by AllAboutTopnews

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