Richard Spencer is a 'terrorist leader', says Florida mayor Lauren Poe

Jonathan Hernandez
October 20, 2017

Protestors are marching against white supremacist Richard Spencer, who is speaking at the University of Florida on Thursday.

The Miami Herald reports those tickets are being handed out on a first-come, first-served basis by Spencer's National Policy Institute, a Southern Poverty Center-designated hate group.

The school has called in hundreds of law enforcement officers from federal, state, county and city sources. UF says $500,000 has been spent, by the university and other agencies, to enhance security on campus and in Gainesville for the event.

Many churches and community centers held vigils to pray for peace and some students even gathered outside of the Phillips Center, where Spencer will speak today, to unite against his ideologies early.

The protesters said they are against what Spencer stands for.

Fuchs told CNN there would be more police on campus than at any time in the university's history.

"I really don't believe that's fair that the taxpayer is now subsidizing through these kind of events the security and having to subsidize his hate speech", he said.

Weapons are banned, along with a wide range of other items, including water bottles, masks, shields and hats.

Thousands had swamped the university to challenge Spencer's appearance, which has cost about $600,000 for security and had prompted Gov. Rick Scott to declare a state of emergency for the area.

"Everyone is welcome at #SpenceratUF", Spencer tweeted before the event Thursday.

Spencer gained national prominence in recent years for his support of President Donald Trump and for his views calling for a separate nation for white people.

Alachua County Sheriff's Office spokesman Chris Sims said the office used the lessons of Charlottesville in planning.

Richard Spencer said the emergency declaration was "flattering" but "most likely overkill".

But in a climate in which the conversation is focused on affordability, ROI and the public burden of higher education, framing opposition to allowing these individuals on campus is an incredibly savvy move which will catch the attention of the same legislators who seek to push through bills to protect free speech above all. University of Florida President Kent Fuchs rejected Spencer's plan to speak on campus last month, but relented after Spencer threatened to sue.

Other reports by AllAboutTopnews

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