Trump tweets hurting legal case - key adviser's husband

Jackie Newman
June 8, 2017

On Monday, he slammed his Justice Department on Twitter for what he views as a "watered down" version.

At best, the experts said, the solicitor general's office can no longer argue that the president himself wanted the executive order only to pause immigration from six Muslim-majority countries temporarily so the USA can study its vetting procedures. The second ban was also put on hold by courts.

White House Principal Deputy Press Secretary Sarah Huckabee Sanders said Monday afternoon Trump "absolutely" supports the current travel ban. "The courts are slow and political!" the USA president wrote.

President Trump tweeted on Monday that he prefers to call the measure a "travel ban" as opposed to "some politically correct term".

Last week, Trump clarified his intent to appeal to the Supreme Court to overturn the lower courts blockage of the revised ban, issued in March. During the campaign, Trump said he could make an exception to his travel ban for Khan, a Muslim. "He isn't concerned with being politically correct".

Judges and jurists also pointed to Trump's rhetoric during the presidential campaign calling several times for a "total and complete shutdown of Muslims entering the United States".

The revised order removed language barring legal permanent residents and a clause that protected religious minorities.

After President Trump's first executive order was blocked, the president signed a second one, imposing a ban on travel from Iran, Sudan, Syria, Libya, Somalia, and Yemen for 90 days.

Lawyers, well aware that handling a complex legal case is not for amateurs, have long believed in an old saying (more colorful than this) that clients who represent themselves take real risks.

"It's kinda odd to have the defendant in Hawaii vs Trump acting as our co-counsel".

We need to be smart, vigilant and tough.

But Conway's concerns echoed the sentiment of many on Monday, who seemed to agree that the tweets, which are nearly certain to be brought up in future litigation, could do nothing but hurt the Department of Justice's efforts. Journalists and political critics of the president seem to have read "Muslim ban" into the phrase "travel ban", confusing wishful thinking on their part for legal analysis.

"It has nothing to do with religion, or skin colour or the way they live their lives, but all about security for the U.S., nothing else", Kelly said.

Last week, the administration rolled out new policies for some people seeking U.S. visas who are deemed subject to greater scrutiny. He may realize that he doesn't have the votes on the Supreme Court to uphold his ban, so why not blast away?

Now, with the matter headed for the Supreme Court, Trump, with his Twitter rant, has worsened his own case, perhaps irreparably.

Said Spicer, in response to a reporter's question about Trump's tweets: "The president is the president of the United States, so they are considered official statements by the president of the United States".

But such criticism does not have much impact on President Trump.

The husband of top White House adviser Kellyanne Conway took to Twitter on Monday to criticize President Trump's "travel ban" tweets.

Other reports by AllAboutTopnews

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