There's still no jury for the Martin Shkreli trial

Jackie Newman
June 28, 2017

During questioning Monday, several potential jurors said they couldn't ignore Shkreli's reputation for raising the price of a life-saving drug by 5,000 percent.

"I believe the defendant is the face of corporate greed in America", one septuagenarian man proclaimed, according to Bloomberg.

The trial could last just over a month.

Though Shkreli's notoriety came from Daraprim, the federal securities fraud case is unrelated.

The 34-year-old is accused of stealing millions from a second pharmaceutical company to pay back losses from bad trades in a hedge fund he had on the side.

When Brafman began talking to Matsumoto publicly about the negative comments about his client, Shkreli smirked broadly at reporters in the gallery.

"I'm anticipating an article, a piece, that will further complicate the already complicated job of defending someone people feel so strongly about", Shkreli's attorney Ben Brafman said.

A man said both of his parents took Daraprim, a drug for a rare parasitic infection.

Further, the man said, he has several friends with H.I.V. or AIDS - people who may use Daraprim for infections - who can not afford their drugs. But if the first day of jury selection is any indication, he's unlikely to have much luck finding average citizens who can maintain a neutral stance on the controversial life sciences investor.

"I think he's a very evil man", said one young woman in Brooklyn, New York, federal court as she was questioned by Judge Kiyo Matsumoto out of Shkreli's earshot about her bias toward him, as prosecutors and defense lawyers listened in.
To a large degree, Shkreli is the victim of his own behavior, which included a series of Twitter rants lashing out at everyone from the media to politicians. Five counts each carry maximum sentences of 20 years in prison; the other three are a maximum of five years each.

Many also thought Shkreli was responsible for the skyrocketing price of EpiPens, which isn't the case. But the event drew protest from angry students, who rattled pill bottles filled with coins and shouted insults at him. He denies the charges, which relate to his time running two hedge funds and at Retrophin, a drug company.

Other reports by AllAboutTopnews

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